M.Sc Nursing

A Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) is an advanced-level postgraduate degree for registered nurses and is considered an entry-level degree for nurse educators and managers. The degree also may prepare a nurse to seek a career as a nurse administrator, health policy expert, or clinical nurse leader. The MSN may be used as a prerequisite for doctorate-level nursing education, and previously was required to become an advanced practice registered nurse such as a nurse practitioner, clinical nurse specialist, nurse anesthetist, or nurse midwife. This graduate-level degree may focus on one or more of many different advanced nursing specialties such as acute care, adult, family, gerontology, neonatology, palliative care, pediatric, psychiatric, or obstetrics and gynecological nursing.

We provide you nursing care that makes you feel at home. We believe we care & God cures…

Clinical Specialisations Offered:

  • Medical Surgical Nursing – Cardio  Thoracic Nursing
  • Child Health Nursing
  •  Mental Health Nursing

B.Sc Nursing

The Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN, BScN) also known in some countries as a Bachelor of Nursing (BN) or Bachelor of Science (BS) with a Major in Nursing is an academic degree in the science and principles of nursing, granted by an accredited tertiary education provider. The course of study is typically three or four years.

The bachelor’s degree prepares nurses for a wide variety of professional roles and graduate study. Course work includes nursing science, research, leadership, and related sciences that inform the practice of nursing. It also provides the student with general education in math, humanities and social sciences. An undergraduate degree affords opportunities for greater career advancement and higher salary options. It is often a prerequisite for teaching, administrative, consulting and research roles.

A Bachelor of Science in Nursing is not currently required for entry into professional nursing in all countries. In the US there has been an effort for it to become the entry-level degree since 1964, when the American Nurses Association (ANA) advanced the position that the minimum preparation for beginning professional nursing practice should be baccalaureate degree education in nursing. The Institute of Medicine (IOM) affirmed in 2010 that nurses should achieve higher levels of education and training through an improved education system that promotes seamless academic progression.